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31
Oct

Some fun horse and dog trivia

The tallest living horse is Big Jake, a nine-year-old Belgian Gelding horse, who measured 20 hands 2.75 in (210.19 cm, 82.75 in), without shoes, at Smokey Hollow Farms in Poynette, Wisconsin, USA, on 19 January 2010. Read more »

31
Oct

Electrolyte deficiencies in horses – analyzing Horse Hair Analysis™

FROM THE DESK OF MARK DEPAOLO, DVM:

WHAT MINERALS ARE CONSIDERED ELECTROLYTES?

Electrolytes consist of Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Sodium (Na) and Potassium (K). Electrolytes are integral in the maintenance of hydration, muscle contraction, nerve conduction as well as the acid/base balance of the blood.

Common causes of electrolyte deficiency are: Read more »

27
Oct

Chromium is an important mineral for horses with Cushings

FROM THE DESK OF MARK DEPAOLO, DVM:

Chromium is a very important nutritional mineral.  It is especially important for horses with endocrine disorders or metabolic syndromes such as Cushings, Pre-Cushings, Syndrome X and Hypothyroidism.  This is due to the fact that Chromium is integral in the regulation, stabilization, metabolism and absorption of sugars in the blood.

I am recognizing that Chromium deficiency is very common in horses.  More than half of the Horse Hair Analysis™ tests that we process show inadequate levels of this mineral.  Low Chromium levels in the body are typically caused by one of two reasons: Read more »

21
Oct

Electrolyte deficiencies in horses lead to musculoskeletal issues

FROM THE DESK OF MARK DEPAOLO,DVM:

Our research is far from done, but preliminary Horse Hair Analysis™ results have indicated that most horses with muscle issues are lacking all 4 major electrolytes (calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium) as well as iron, zinc, chromium, selenium and cobalt.  It is quite common for us to see these imbalances all together in horses with musculoskeletal issues such as: Read more »

18
Oct

Have we been naughty or nice at DEC?

The Hammacher Schlemmer catalog came a few days ago and we got out our Sharpees® to circle the items on our wish lists.  Do you think Dr. Mark has been naughty or nice this year?  We’ll give you a hint …. Read more »

18
Oct

Lyme Disease in horses – Treatment and Prevention

Lyme Disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the spirochete B burgdorferi. Lyme Disease can be divided into early disease (stage 1, EM), disseminated infection (stage 2), and late disease (stage 3, persistent infection). The first stage involves the skin, followed by stages 2 and 3, which often affect Read more »

10
Oct

Performance enhancing supplements for your horse

Heads up everyone!  The biggest and most competitive horse shows of the year are right around the corner.  Plan ahead!  Make sure you are allowing your horse to perform at his/her best!  Here are some of our favorite products to help you and horse Read more »

6
Oct

Lyme Disease in horses – Symptoms and Diagnosis

Lyme Disease was first identified in the 1970s in Lyme, Connecticut. The Northeastern and North Central United States as well as some Southern states are the most common locales where Lyme disease is present.  Lyme disease is carried by deer ticks and Western black-legged ticks which are most prevalent on the eastern seaboard.  It is estimated that roughly 50% Read more »

5
Oct

Silly stuff for Halloween

In our quest for the perfect Halloween costumes for 2011 we started thinking about horse costumes (as if we actually have somewhere to take our horses on Halloween).  Regardless,  there are tons of outfits out there for dogs: hotdog costumes – both with and without mustard, bumblebees, Santa, Yoda, Elvis..and the list goes on.  They are even selling dog costumes at mainstream stores like Target (98 choices online to be exact).  Horses though? Looks like it is DIY if you want to dress your horse up for Halloween. Read more »

5
Oct

Managing your horse’s water in the winter

Most horse owner tend to be concerned with water consumption in the summer because of hot weather and dehydration but it is important to pay attention to water intake and the water source in the winter months as well.  Proper drainage and water maintenance are crucial to a horse’s health.  Here are some simple ways to prevent water on your property from being contaminated and therefore unfit for horses to drink. Read more »