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May 22, 2012

Famous horses of the American Civil War

by DePaolo Equine Concepts

Memorial Day is a time to remember and give thanks to those in the military who lost their lives serving our country.  We thought we would do a bit of research on horses who went to war.

From the American Civil War:

Ulysses S. Grant’s favorite horse, acquired in 1864 was named Cincinnati.  Grant’s second string of horse were named Kangaroo, Jack and Jeff Davis (who was also used by John Bell Hood).

General Custer’s horse  most used horse was named Don Juan but his favorite one was named Lancer.  Comanche, pictured below, is said to be the only documented survivor of General Custer’s 7th Cavalry detachment at the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Stonewall Jackson was riding Little Sorrel when he was fatally wounded at Chancellorsville.  ‘Sorrel” is buried on the VMI parade deck just feet from the famous statue of Jackson.

Moscow, who was said to be solid white, was Philip Kearny’s favorite horse but he wouldn’t ride him due to his “conspicuous color”.

Robert E. Lee’s best horse Traveller, below, is buried with Lee at Lee Chapel.  This American Saddlebred gelding was light grey and stood over 16 hands.  General Lee’s other horse Lucy Long outlived Lee and died at the old age of 34.

  

A few other odd named horses from the Civil War are: Tom Telegraph, Slicky, Red Pepper, Plug Ugly, Grape, Grand Old Canister and Fire-Eater.

Even though the movie War Horse was based on World War I, maybe you should rent it this weekend to truly appreciate what these noble steeds went through all those decades ago.

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